The Year of the Worker: Stacey Wadle’s Story

Meet the working people who are changing their workplaces and our country.

Along with record levels of inequality came an unprecedented and powerful response from working people. Throughout 2019, from nurses and fast food workers to factory workers and school employees, we demanded better working conditions and our right to a voice through a union. We rallied, protested, marched and even went on strike to fight for good jobs and the better futures our families deserve. 

And those actions resulted in big wins. Together, we’re reshaping our country and demanding a fix for the rigged economy. That’s why we’re celebrating 2019 as the year of the worker. Check out some of the top victories working people have won by coming together to demand better this year.

Adjunct Professors Win a Union at Largest Community College in the Country

“Today, I’m proud to be united with my colleagues in winning the biggest adjunct professor union with Faculty Forward,” said Stacey Wadle, an adjunct professor of business and communications. “As politicians chip away at our young people’s futures, we’re uniting to fight back. It’s clear to anyone watching the tide of professor organizing sweeping the state that something big is happening here.”

The organizing campaign gained national attention when the school’s administration launched an aggressive anti-union campaign while pushing their low-paid employees to sign up their children for Medicaid or other government sponsored healthcare programs. Miami Dade College adjuncts are also one of seven groups of adjuncts who have won their union in just the last few years, despite harsh opposition in the “right to work” state.

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